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lecture-series

Lectures

Lectures are presentations given at a local facility and presented by an industry expert.

Description

This seminar discusses how weather impacts chiller performance and how a system can be designed to optimize the chiller plant for cold condenser water operation. Also reviewed is how chiller construction can be used to leverage cold condenser water and the associated energy savings.

Focus Area

Systems

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Select the reason that chiller efficiency improves with lower condenser water temperature
  • Explain why it is advantageous to invest in a larger cooling tower
  • Describe the best location for a bypass valve when using cold condenser water
  • State where a waterside economizer is required by ASHRAE 90.1
  • Describe how the bypass valve used with a waterside economizer should be piped

Experience Level

school school school

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded

Description

This seminar compares types of chiller compression and how load and lift are impacted by each. In addition the results of ASHRAE Research Projects 601 and 751 are discussed and how to evaluate chiller performance and strategies for staging chiller plants to optimize performance.

Focus Area

Applications

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • State the reason that a screw chiller is more stable at part load than a centrifugal chiller
  • Select a reason why a load balancing valve will negatively impact efficiency
  • State the impact on performance of the oil in circulation with the refrigerant in a chiller
  • Name a better way of evaluating chiller part load performance than just the use of IPLV and the fallacy of using IPLV as a part load rating

Experience Level

schoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

ASHRAE 90.1 requirements have continued to become more stringent with each revision to the standard. The impact on chiller efficiency has led many to believe that little more can be done to improve efficiency of chillers. This seminar looks at how the selection of the type of chiller and how by taking advantage of its operating envelope, as well as the use of a series counterflow piping arrangement can result in over a 50% improvement over the ASHRAE 90.1 Standard.

Focus Area

Applications

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Describe the difference in part load operation between centrifugal and screw chillers
  • Explain how condenser water temperature impacts screw and centrifugal operation and efficiency
  • Explain how a screw chiller in a series-counterflow arrangement can provide savings over centrifugals in standard parallel arrangements

Experience Level

schoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

Some applications such as hospitals and hospitality have a constant need of heating energy even during the hottest days of the year and these same facilities often need to run chillers during the coldest days. Engineers often question what chiller technology will most efficiently recover what is otherwise wasted energy. This presentation evaluates how screw and centrifugal chiller technology can best be applied to efficiently recover the rejected energy. The best solution depends on part load performance and chiller piping arrangements.

Focus Area

Applications

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Describe what waste heat is and how it may be captured
  • Explain how heat recovery can help in meeting ASHRAE 90.1 requirements and help achieve LEED® points
  • Describe how chiller lift is impacted when chillers are used for heat recovery
  • Explain how to size chillers used for heat reclaim
  • Explain how to avoid common mistakes when chillers are applied in heat reclaim

Experience Level

schoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

When properly applied, waterside economizers can be a power tool for energy savings in a WSHP system. By utilizing the cold ambient conditions to generate chilled loop temperature, the waterside economizer can provide “Free” system cooling. This presentation provides a path to understanding waterside economizers for WSHP systems and how to properly apply them for maximum energy savings.

Focus Area

Applications

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Distinguish between WSHP heating and cooling mode and the impact on water loop temperature
  • Identify the difference in integrated and non-integrated economizers
  • Select the benefits of waterside economizers for energy savings
  • Select the application conditions for when waterside economizer should be used
  • Identify for a given climate zone if waterside economizer is required

Experience Level

schoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

WSHP systems are a widely popular system, due to their flexibility and high efficiency for both cooling and heating. With new advances in technology and design strategies, there are many ways to further enhance WSHP system efficiency. This presentation explores some of those efficiency enhancing concepts, such as waterside economizer, enhanced motor technologies, and utilizing DOAS units.

Focus Area

Applications

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Select the correct operating modes and conditions for a WSHP on a boiler / tower loop
  • Pick the types of loops used in geothermal heat pump systems and show how they save energy
  • Select reasons that demonstrate how a waterside economizer can save energy and where it is most effective
  • Distinguish between the various types of motor technology use in WSHP and how enhanced fan motor technology can save energy

Experience Level

schoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

The piping system used on screw chillers has an impact on their performance. This presentation looks at how the chiller plants hydronic system influences screw chiller operation at part load and why a good turn down ratio is important. Changing condenser water temperatures and varying system load represent a significant opportunity for energy savings but the chiller and the piping system must be designed to take advantage of the saving potential.

Focus Area

Technology

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Select from a list the chiller plant piping design that has the lowest installed and operating cost
  • Pick from a list what turndown is and its impact on chiller operation
  • Name ways that chiller lift and performance are related
  • Select from a list items that influence chiller part load operation
  • Distinguish how chiller staging will influence system part load efficiency and why that is important in determining annual energy use
  • Distinguish how a series counterflow arrangement will result in better part load efficiency for both pumps and chiller

Experience Level

schoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded

Description

As Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems (DOAS) have gained in popularity, many different supply air control methods have arisen. Every one of these methods has something in common; a reheat system. This presentation explores the various types of DOAS reheat systems available, such as hot gas reheat, liquid subcooling, and sealed refrigerant loops; and describes how to apply reheat systems for various supply air control methods, such as neutral supply air, space sensible load offset, and space latent load offset.

Focus Area

Applications

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Select from a list the intended functions of Dedicated Outdoor Air System (DOAS) when used in a typical application
  • Identify how a DOAS can decouple system latent and sensible loads
  • Distinguish between the system impacts of using cool or neutral supply air dry bulb temperatures with a Dedicated Outdoor Air System
  • Recognize the system impacts of series and parallel systems
  • Contrast different reheat strategies for Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems and identify best case applications for each

Experience Level

schoolschoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

This presentation looks at tools an engineer can use to determine the most cost and energy effective solution to chiller projects. There is no one solution that is the perfect system for all applications. Things like system load, weather conditions and chiller performance make nearly every project unique. In this presentation the steps of evaluating these various influences on energy and economic performance are evaluated by using a step by step evaluation process.

Focus Area

Systems

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • State the purpose of chiller system optimization
  • Define the levels of part loading performance
  • Name the information needed to perform the analysis
  • Explain how to set up a chiller plant
  • State different energy strategies and effects on life cycle costs
  • Describe how to interpret the PLV analysis and chiller economics
  • Explain the impact on design before putting it on paper
  • List how chiller design impacts incentives

Experience Level

schoolschoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

This presentation will focus on the design of custom DOAS units with respect to providing adequate outdoor air, and considering the IAQ procedure when the reduction of outdoor air pollutants is a concern. A system approach to combining DOAS units with chilled beam technology is reviewed. Particular focus will be given to this combined strategy’s energy savings potential as it is applied to LEED® EA credits.

Focus Area

Systems

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Outline specific sections of ASHRAE Standard 62.1 as it applies to Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems
  • Identify various AHU design strategies that can comply with ASHRE 90.1 as it pertains to energy recovery and filtration
  • Review the predominant filtration technologies incorporated into custom DOAS to minimize particulate, chemical, and biological contaminants
  • Evaluate methods of reducing life-cycle costs without sacrificing adequate environmental quality

Experience Level

schoolschoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs / 0.2 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH / 1.5 PDH
CMP : Yes

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

Arriving at the correct ventilation system design for a multiple-zone application using the ASHRAE Standard 62.1 Ventilation Rate Procedure is not a simple task. There are many variables that must be factored into the process some of which include complex equations. Arriving at the optimized ventilation system design for a multiple-zone application requires further analysis. Software evaluation of multiple scenarios may be required in arriving at the most cost effective quantity of ventilation while maintaining good IAQ. This seminar walks through the VRP method and how to use software simulations to optimize ventilation.

Focus Area

Codes & Standards

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Select the correct procedure of ASHRAE Standard 62.1 and what building application it covers
  • Recognize where each of the 3 methods of determining ventilation air can be used
  • Properly put the steps of the VRP in order
  • Select the appropriate values for space ventilation from table 6.1 of ASHRAE Standard 62.1
  • Select the factors that impact the correction factor for air distribution effectiveness
  • Identify the correct use of the time averaging correction
  • Pick a reason that the ventilation rates must be corrected for air distribution effectiveness
  • Identify what is meant by the critical space and how it is determined
  • Select a reason that the use of software could help optimize ventilation design

Experience Level

schoolschoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

This seminar starts with the often forgotten fundamentals of the fan laws and reading fan curves and demonstrates how the best selection might not be the larger size. Forward curve fans have been the popular choice for years but in recent years the use of plenum fans has become more common. This seminar explores where the use of plenum fans best fit and how to apply them to achieve a cost effective and energy efficient solution.

Focus Area

Systems

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Define from memory the relationship between flow/speed/pressure known as fan laws
  • Show on a fan curve the MSE line and in what region fans should be selected
  • Pick from a list all the correct characteristics of FC, AF and plenum fans
  • On a fan curve for a VAV application indicate minimum pressure rating, rating point, MSE and SC and typical values for each
  • Select from a list for a CV and VAV application how the wheel should be selected relative to MSE
  • Select from a list the benefits of DDPF for selection and motor control
  • Pick from a list how circuiting impacts fan selection
  • Select the definition of system effect and how charts can be used to determine the impact

Experience Level

schoolschoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded

Description

The federal government has mandated that all states bring their state energy codes up to at least the level of ASHRAE 90.1- 2010 by 2013. This version is a significant improvement (30%) over the 2004 version which is used as the benchmark. The 2010 version incorporated over 109 addenda and the 2013 version introduced over 90 more, many which impact HVAC systems.This seminar will give the HVAC designer a practical evaluation of the 2010 and 2013 changes and the way they will influence HVAC design. Several practical examples are used and climate specific impacts are highlighted allowing designers to evaluate the impacts of the changes on designs in their local region.

Focus Area

Codes & Standards

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Explain why a mechanical engineer should understand ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 / 2013
  • Select the appropriate unit efficiency for a project and adjust a chiller for non-standard conditions
  • Explain when a economizer must be used
  • Describe when reheat is allowed
  • Use the fan system limitation calculation
  • State when heat / energy recovery must be used

Experience Level

schoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs / 0.2 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH / 1.5 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

The Montreal Protocol had a major impact on our industry and today's concerns over GWP now appear to have the potential for similar changes. The US Government continues to push for regulations that will address the GWP issue and refrigerants are often considered in these regulations. Consulting engineers need to know the whole story and understand when and how it might impact their designs. This seminar will address the choices of refrigerants and the scope of the regulations and codes that impact refrigerant choices for chillers now and in the future.

Focus Area

Technology

On Demand Link

link https://classroom.carrieruniversity.com/course/view.php?id=385

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • List the three characteristics that influence the use of refrigerants in chillers
  • Define Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP)
  • Match the refrigerant to the safety classifications
  • Identify the issues addressed by the Montreal Protocol
  • State the relationship between GWP and TEWI
  • Match ASHRAE Standards to their environmental impact
  • Identify which industry group influences refrigerant choices most
  • Select the best applications for different refrigerants

Experience Level

schoolschoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded videocam On-Demand

Description

International Energy Conservation Code 2015 has been adopted in 12 states in the USA as of December 2017. The IECC-2015 code has a number of new requirements which impacts the application of HVAC equipment and method of compliance with the requirements. This seminar examines the new requirements and available methods of compliance. This is one of 3 on the subject the other two are more detailed discussions on the impacts on chilled water and DX systems.

Focus Area

Codes & Standards

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Relate the evolution, background and intent of the IECC-2015 code to local code and know your states current adoption
  • Select what building types need to meet the requirements for the Commercial and Residential provisions in IECC – 2015
  • Identify the 6 major chapters of IECC- 2015 and the scope of each
  • Pick the 3 compliance paths to IECC – 2015 as it applies to energy requirements
  • Identify mandatory, prescriptive and additional requirements for mechanical systems as it applies to rooftops and chillers
  • Identify mandatory and prescriptive efficiency packages for lighting systems
  • Summarize key points and compare ASHRAE 90.1-2013 with IECC - 2015

Experience Level

schoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded

Description

The LEED® rating system has been evolving since its inception in 1998. LEED® V4 has been out for a few years but after October 31, 2016 it is required for all new projects. This new version makes some major shifts in execution as it moves from prescriptive to performance based results. This presentation will address the key impacts of version 4.0 changes on mechanical design in commercial buildings.

Focus Area

Codes & Standards

On Demand Link

link https://classroom.carrieruniversity.com/course/view.php?id=384

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Select the correct LEED® V4 rating system for a building category
  • State the credit requirements for cooling towers in the WE category
  • Select the methods which can be used for the EA prerequisite and credit for energy use
  • Select an impact of Demand Response credit has on HVAC systems
  • Pick a method used to comply with the prerequisite and credit for energy metering
  • Select a significant changes in the EQ category for minimum indoor air quality and the Enhanced Indoor Air Quality Strategies credit
  • Select resources used to comply with the perquisite and credit for acoustical performance

Experience Level

schoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded videocam On-Demand

Description

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 2013 requires eliminating mechanical cooling in chilled water systems at outdoor ambient conditions below 50°F DB/45°F WB. This seminar describes how to incorporate an integrated waterside economizer into a chilled water system and demonstrates using modeling tools for proper application of the economizer and optimization of the chiller plant.

Focus Area

Systems

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Correlate the major components of a chilled water plant with their functions and common energy strategies
  • Identify factors that affect a building load analysis and waterside economizer design decisions and effectively contributing to sustainability and energy performance
  • Associate the major components of a chilled water system that integrates a waterside economizer with their operation
  • Differentiate integrated and non-integrated waterside economizers system layout, basic operation, and other considerations
  • Identify the relative energy reductions achieved in an example analysis of various combinations of waterside economizer

Experience Level

schoolschoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded

Description

Executive order 13693 requires that federal agencies reduce energy intensity by 25% annually by 2020. The United States General Services Administration, GSA, conducted a study in 2016 comparing two chiller technologies over four seasons to determine the most efficient compressor technology over a range of application conditions. This seminar examines the new technology evolution in chillers and the impact on chiller efficiency. The impact of this technology on both water and air cooled chillers is covered.

Focus Area

Technology

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Identify developments in the evolution of compression technologies and impact on air-cooled and water-cooled chillers
  • Distinguish AHRI IPLV estimated performance from actual measured performance and identify reasons for disparities
  • Identify key findings of a government study comparing real-world variable speed screw chiller performance with alternate technology
  • Select why variable speed screw technology is applied to water-cooled chillers and resulting impacts
  • Identify key criteria to consider when evaluating air-cooled and water cooled variable speed screw chillers

Experience Level

schoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

This seminar address causes of low delta T Syndrome, which causes additional chiller and pump energy to be consumed in order to maintain design load. Several design and operational techniques are examined to minimize low delta T syndrome in chilled water plants.

Focus Area

Systems

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Select what is meant by low delta T syndrome
  • Pick the ways low delta T syndrome impacts a chilled water system
  • Define what is meant by diversity as it applies to a chilled water system
  • Select the best range of delta T for most chilled water systems
  • Select the impact of low delta T on fan HP

Experience Level

schoolschoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded

Description

International Energy Conservation Code 2015 has been adopted in 12 states in the USA as of December 2017. The IECC-2015 code has a number of new requirements which impacts the application of HVAC equipment and method of compliance with the requirements. This seminar is the one of 3 on this topic. These seminars provide an overview of the code and examine the new requirements and available methods of compliance. This seminar looks at specific requirements on DX systems.

Focus Area

Codes & Standards

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • State how to determine if IECC-2015 code impacts DX systems in your state
  • Identify how the 3 compliance path impact DX systems
  • Define how requirements for sizing and equipment selection effect DX system selection
  • Identify the requirements for control of AC and heat pump units
  • Relate the requirements for air side economizers to various types of DX systems
  • Select the appropriate heat recovery option for a DX system based on operation and climate zone
  • State how the selection of the additional efficiency packages required by IECC-2015 impact CW systems

Experience Level

schoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

International Energy Conservation Code 2015 has been adopted in 12 states in the USA as of December 2017. The IECC-2015 code has a number of new requirements which impacts the application of HVAC equipment and method of compliance with the requirements. This seminar is the one of 3 on this topic. These seminars provide an overview of the code and examine the new requirements and available methods of compliance. This seminar looks at specific requirements on CW systems.

Focus Area

Codes & Standards

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • State how to determine if IECC-2015 code impacts CW systems in your state
  • Pick the 3 compliance paths to IECC – 2015 as it applies to energy requirements of CW systems
  • Identify how to determine the two paths used to determine minimum chiller efficiency and how to select the best path for a project
  • Relate the requirements for air side economizers to various types and capacities of chilled water systems
  • Identify the requirements for waterside economizers and how to determine if waterside or airside economizers are the best solution for a project
  • Select the mandatory requirements for hydronic system controls
  • State how the selection of the additional efficiency packages required by IECC-2015 impact CW systems

Experience Level

schoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded

Description

This presentation will review the commonly used design guides found in ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1,“Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality.” The two mechanical ventilation procedures the Ventilation Rate Procedure and the Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) procedure are discussed. How the IAQ procedure provides a directed approach by reducing and controlling the concentrations of selected air contaminants of concern through both dilution and enhanced air cleaning are explained.

Focus Area

Technology

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Select specific sections of ASHRAE Standard 62.1 as it applies to building filtration
  • Identify various AHU design strategies that can comply with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 189.1 High Performance Green Buildings as it pertains to building filtration
  • Name the predominant filtration technologies that can be incorporated into central station AHU’s to minimize particulate, chemical and biological contaminants
  • Identify how environmental air quality can affect health and cognitive functioning
  • Select air cleaning methods that compliment dilution and can serve as a means of saving energy and protecting the occupied space

Experience Level

schoolschoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded

Description

This seminar explores the refrigerants available today and looks at the current regulations that govern them. A review of the Montreal Protocol, Kyoto Protocol, Kigali Agreement and SNAP is examined for regulation and phase out impact. New refrigerant options are compared for application, safety and ability to retrofit into existing equipment. Timing of how new refrigerants might be included in future building codes is also analyzed.

Focus Area

Technology

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Know the legal framework in the USA and the world regarding use of HFC’s
  • Understand the reasons why R-123 is phasing-out while R-134a is phasing down
  • Recognize the different safety classifications used by ASHRAE
  • Identify the most promising low GWP refrigerants available for chillers today
  • Understand how standards and codes govern what and when new refrigerants can be used

Experience Level

schoolschoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded

Description

This seminar defines the categories of 100% outdoor air equipment used in commercial applications. It covers the three outside design conditions as defined by ASHRAE and how they affect equipment selection. In addition, the presentation covers control sequences and application requirements.

Focus Area

Applications

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Identify key aspects of ASHRAE 62.1 ventilation requirements as they apply to DOAS
  • Select how major types of HVAC equipment can be used and configured, to meet ventilation requirements
  • Identify suitable conditions and design techniques for DOAS applications
  • Choose appropriate DOAS sizing, selection and strategies

Experience Level

schoolschoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded

Description

In this presentation we discuss what Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) systems are with emphasis on 2-pipe systems and the heat pump and heat recovery configurations. An overview of VRF technology including indoor units, solenoid box, outdoor units and controllers is provided. Also covered are VRF system design concepts including compressor technology, oil management and piping and flow. In addition, the presentation covers VRF considerations of application, layout considerations and the need for selection software.

Focus Area

Applications

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Identify key benefits and characteristics common to VRF systems
  • Distinguish between the two primary VRF system types - heat pump and heat recovery
  • Identify the main components of a VRF 2-pipe system
  • Recognize the different system options and be able to identify the key features and benefits of each device
  • Identify the unique designs of a VRF 2-pipe system
  • Select how compressor technology works in the VRF system, and the unique oil management feature of a 2-pipe system
  • Identify the best applications for VRF, equipment layout and layout for zoning, heating and ventilation requirements

Experience Level

schoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

In this presentation we discuss what Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) systems are with emphasis on 3-pipe systems and the heat pump and heat recovery configurations. An overview of VRF technology including indoor units, solenoid box, outdoor units and controllers is provided. Also covered are VRF system design concepts including compressor technology, oil management and piping and flow. In addition, the presentation covers VRF considerations of application, layout considerations and the need for selection software.

Focus Area

Applications

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Identify key benefits and characteristics common to VRF systems
  • Distinguish between the two primary VRF system types - heat pump and heat recovery
  • Identify the main components of a VRF 3-pipe system
  • Recognize the different system options and be able to identify the key features and benefits of each device
  • Explain the unique designs of a VRF 3-pipe system
  • Identify how compressor technology works in the VRF system
  • Identify unique design considerations when designing a VRF system
  • Identify the best applications for VRF, including equipment layout zoning, heating and ventilation

Experience Level

schoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

In this presentation we discuss what Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) systems are and discuss the 2-pipe and 3-pipe systems and their use in heat pump and heat recovery configurations. An overview of VRF technology including indoor units, solenoid box, outdoor units and controllers is provided. Also covered are VRF system design concepts including compressor technology, oil management and piping and flow. In addition, the presentation covers VRF considerations of application, layout considerations and the need for selection software. The presentation will also cover when 2-pipe or 3-pipe should be applied.

Focus Area

Applications

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • Identify key benefits and characteristics common to VRF systems
  • Distinguish between the two primary VRF system types - heat pump and heat recovery
  • Identify the main components of a VRF 2-pipe system and a VRF 3-pipe system
  • Recognize the different system options for both systems and be able to identify the key features and benefits of each device
  • Identify the unique designs of a VRF 2-pipe system and 3-pipe system
  • Select how compressor technology works in the VRF system, and the unique oil management feature of each system type
  • Identify the best applications for 2-pipe and 3-pipe VRF systems based on equipment layout and layout for zoning, heating and ventilation requirements

Experience Level

schoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture

Description

New codes and energy regulations have changed the standard for packaged rooftop unit construction. High performance buildings that are smaller in size and/or consist of one level often sacrifice energy efficiency and comfort. One significant innovation is the use of Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems in smaller rooftop units to meet today’s aggressive energy strategies and provides a high level of comfort. This seminar provides an in-depth look at five HVAC systems designed for high performance environments, and uses an example prototype office building configured to simulate conditions in four different climate zones to demonstrate system performance.

Focus Area

Applications

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course each student should be able to:

  • List two requirements for high performance building classification
  • Identify four HVAC system types suitable for a 50,000 sq. ft. high performance building
  • Describe why energy modeling results may vary as climatic locations change
  • List two energy codes that impact VAV Rooftop application
  • State different energy strategies and effects on life cycle costs

Experience Level

schoolschoolschool

Credentials Offered

IACET : 0.1 CEUs
PE : 1 PDH

Length

1 hour

Format

people Lecture play_circle_filled Pre-Recorded